Beer Me

Would you believe me if I told you ancient Egyptians each drank four liters of beer per day while constructing the pyramids? What about if I told you that a 15 foot wave of beer killed eight people in England in 1814?

Both are true! Ancient Egyptians enjoyed a good beer and the English were afraid of beer for 0.2 seconds. (By the way, these facts are perfect icebreakers.)

There are a lot of crazy stories that involve beer from the last 5,000 years (the first known beer drinkers were from Mesopotamia), and even more crazy stories are shared between friends over a beer today. At Lucy’s, all of our beers are from the best breweries located throughout Wisconsin — even our root beer is from the cheese state.

I’m about to blow your mind if I haven’t already.
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Cheese Curds 101

Cheese Curds 101

You probably know that Wisconsin leads the United States in cheese production (and makes the best cheese), but what you might not know is that cheese is believed to have been discovered by a Middle Eastern nomad. The legend says he poured milk into his saddlebag and after several hours of riding, the milk curdled, thus leaving white curds and liquid. While there’s no definitive proof as to where the first cheese curds were made, Wisconsin would like to take the credit.

Cheese curds are made when the whey and curd separate in the cheese making process. The result is fresh, mildly salty nuggets of cheese about the size of a peanut. They’re about as firm as regular cheese, but cheese curds have a springy, rubbery texture that squeak when the elastic protein strands rub against the enamel of your teeth. Although most cheese curds are cheddar, they can also be made with mozzarella, Colby-Jack or Monterey Jack cheeses. Cheese curds are best eaten the day they’re produced, but they can last a couple days in the refrigerator.

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